2019 Houses Awards winners revealed

0

- Advertisement -

Daylesford Longhouse by Partners Hill has been named the 2019 Australian House of the Year. Picture: Rory Gardiner

Australia’s most “outstanding” home has been revealed — and it’s sure to give even the most houseproud among us some serious home envy.

The 2019 Australian House of the Year has gone to a contemporary Australian farmhouse — The Daylesford Longhouse — in Daylesford, Victoria.

The so-called “garden oasis” was selected by judges as it created “an innovative model for rural living”.

The prestigious awards are now in their ninth year, and judge Lindy Atkin said the 2019 winners were all “very sensitive to site and context”.

“These are homes, not just houses. The homes in the images have people in them, they have things in them — they weren’t cleared of clutter and this tells some really interesting stories,” she said.

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE OF THE YEAR

The Daylesford Longhouse by Partners Hill in Victoria took out the top spot this year, with judges celebrating the contemporary Australian farmhouse’s unique design.

“The Daylesford Longhouse by Partners Hill is more than a remarkable home — it’s also a hardworking farm building, a verdant greenhouse and a new business set-up, all within the confines of a 110-metre-long shed,” the judges said.

The home is described as a “garden oasis set atop sprawling acreage”.

Daylesford Longhouse by Partners Hill has been named the 2019 Australian House of the Year. Picture: Rory Gardiner

The home is a 110m-long shed. Picture: Rory Gardiner

NEW HOUSE UNDER 200 SQUARE METRES

Bay Guarella House by Peter Stutchbury Architecture, on the NSW South Coast, won the New House Under 200 Square Metres category.

Set on a west-facing slope in a eucalyptus forest, this “shared retreat between friends” is set over two floors and is “rotated to the contours”.

Bay Guarella House by Peter Stutchbury Architecture, on the NSW South Coast, won the New House Under 200 Square Metres category. Picture: Michael Nicholson

NEW HOUSE OVER 200 SQUARE METRES

Daylesford Longhouse by Partners Hill also won the New House Over 200 Square Metres category after nailing a “novel and challenging design brief”.

The home is actually a 110-metre-long shed, which takes you from a working farm to cosy living quarters, with layers of mature trees, vines and other plants growing in all the spaces between.

The property contains three elements — a home, a commercial cooking school and a working farm building — within the one prefabricated shed structure.

Daylesford Longhouse also won the New House Over 200 Square Metres category. Picture: Rory Gardiner

HOUSE ALTERATION AND ADDITION UNDER 200 SQUARE METRES

An ambitious project transformed a former 1930s electrical substation located in a former seedy red light district and slum in inner Sydney into an “elegantly sparse, compact, minimal and monochromatic interior”.

House in Darlinghurst by Tribe Studio features Venetian glass bricks and a “spacious rooftop pool terrace”.

House in Darlinghurst by Tribe Studio won the House Alteration and Addition Under 200 Square Metres award. Picture: Katherine Lu

HOUSE ALTERATION AND ADDITION OVER 200 SQUARE METRES

This award was taken out by joint winners Brisbane Riverbank House by Owen Architecture from Brisbane and Teneriffe House by Vokes and Peters, also located in the Queensland capital.

Brisbane Riverbank House is located on a “gentle knoll on the edge of a riverbank” and is an addition to an existing home for a car collector who wanted a dwelling that would enable a simple way of living, with spaces for family and friends to enjoy together.

Brisbane Riverbank House by Owen Architecture was one of the joint winners of the House Alteration and Addition Over 200 Square Metres category. Picture: Simon Devitt

Teneriffe House is shared by an “extended multi-generational family” and is a “culturally significant 1909 Brisbane house” originally designed by AB Wilson.

… as was Teneriffe House by Vokes and Peters. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones

APARTMENT OR UNIT

The Bae TAS by Work by Liz and Alex is described as “an exercise in doing more with less”.

It involved the conversion of a 1970s 26-square-metre bedsit in Hobart.

The Bae TAS by Work by Liz and Alex from Hobart took out the Apartment or Unit prize. Picture: Sean Fennessy

GARDEN OR LANDSCAPE

Whynot St Pool and Carport by Kieron Gait Architects with Dan Young Landscape Architecture is “part building and part archaeological dig” and involved a lot of construction, including a carport and store, a terrace and pool.

The garden is “wild” and river rocks replace the “typical timber deck, turf lawn or hard paving”, resulting in an “unexpected” and innovative design.

Best Garden or Landscape wet to Whynot St Pool and Carport by Kieron Gait Architects with Dan Young Landscape Architecture. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones

SUSTAINABILITY

The Garden Bunkie by Reddog in Brisbane took out the Sustainability gong after a “long deliberation” by judges.

The light-filled building connects to a garden, providing a flexible space that could be a quiet retreat for a new parent, an evening workspace or a guesthouse for extended family.

The Garden Bunkie by Reddog. Picture: Christopher Frederick Jones

HOUSE IN A HERITAGE CONTEXT

This award was also split between Sydney homes Balmain Rock by Benn + Penna Architecture and House in Darlinghurst by Tribe Studio.

Balmain Rock — a tiny 1860s sandstone cottage — boasts additions that juxtapose new and old materials, including old sandstone and sandstock bricks and slate and concrete.

This award was split between Balmain Rock by Benn + Penna Architecture … Picture: Tom Ferguson

Meanwhile, House in Darlinghurst by Tribe Studio converted a former substation into a compact three-storey home that “celebrates light”.

… and House in Darlinghurst by Tribe Studio. Picture: Katherine Lu

EMERGING ARCHITECTURE PRACTICE

Edition Office in Melbourne, which was founded in 2016 by Aaron Roberts and Kim Bridgland, won the Emerging Architecture Practice award.

The judges noted the practice’s suit of projects that “embodies an inspiring merging of art and architecture”.

Edition Office in Melbourne. Picture: Benjamin Hosking

For the complete list of winners and commendations visit the Houses Awards website, or check out the August edition of Houses magazine.

Continue the conversation @carey_alexis | [email protected]

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.